David Vine
The rise of the far right as a result of the crisis of neoliberalism: the case of Argentina

The rise of the far right as a result of the crisis of neoliberalism: the case of Argentina

Soledad MagnoJavier Milei's rise to the presidency in Argentina represents one of the most striking outcomes of the crisis afflicting the current neoliberal system. This crisis is both systemic and global, and it encompasses multiple dimensions—including food security, climate change and public health—, but it is also compounded by the breakdown of the social contract and the advent of new information and communication technologies. Neoliberalism: A look back Neoliberalism originated in the...

Global Tensions and Trade Sovereignty

Global Tensions and Trade Sovereignty

Pedro Manuel MorenoIt takes a world to feed a world. In the 21st century, with a global population of 8 billion, it would be impossible to feed everyone without the benefits of international trade. This principle applies equally to energy and the green transition: Today, only a handful of countries can claim true sovereignty over their food and energy supplies and are those that, strictly speaking, produce sufficient food and energy for their own needs. Hence, discussing food sovereignty or...

Peace, an Ongoing Endeavour

José Luis Rodríguez ZapateroA horizon of hope marked the dawn of this century, heralded by the adoption of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) by the United Nations. For the first time in history, nations worldwide united in endorsing a comprehensive plan—a programme aimed at eradicating hunger, improving health, advancing education, upholding gender equality, combating desertification and tackling climate change. For the first time in history, a world-encompassing development agenda was...

Why democracies must deliver

Why democracies must deliver

Salil Shetty | Omar WaraichJul-Dec, 2023 -Updated in March 2024-When the people of Brazil threw off Jair Bolsonaro’s authoritarian rule, the celebrations were heard far beyond Bahia, Pernambuco and Maranhão. Across the world, numerous countries have witnessed strongmen vaulting to power through the ballot, using their time in office to eviscerate democracy from within. For alarmed onlookers, Bolsonaro’s fall created an important opening. “Thank you, Brazil”, the Indian journalist Rana Ayyub...

The 2024 Summit of the Future: an opportunity for U.N. regeneration in an era of radical disruptions

Youssef MahmoudJul-Dec, 2023We live in a threshold moment, a liminal space in human history where the world we have known is dying and a new one is yet to be born. During this unsettling interregnum, the multilateral governance system expected to help us navigate the ongoing state of reconfiguration [1][1] Villanueva, Idoia. A More Multipolar but not more Democratic International Scenario: The Geopolitical (dis)Order of a World in Reconfiguration, Metapolis V3N2, October 2022.Available here:...

Towards serious biodiversity policy: foreign debt in the long duree of extractivism

Audrey Irvine-Broque | Jessica DempseyJan-Jun, 2023A hamstrung multilateral agreement It was the early morning hours of December 19th, 2022, and government negotiators were still locked in closed-door meetings. Behind those doors was also the document that everyone was here to see: the final draft of the Kunming-Montreal Global Biodiversity Framework, the crowning achievement of the two-week negotiation, and the many weeks and years of meetings that came before that. Under the shadow of the...

Multipolar dispute: between old mistakes and new uncertainties (Part II)

Irene López | Marta Cazorla“Only the dead have seen the end of the war”, said Plato in Menexenus. More than 20 centuries have passed since then and, undeniably, war seems to be an eternal, inextinguishable problem, threatening to rear its ugly head even in civilised Europe, in a post-heroic era we thought was strained by terrorism and so-called hybrid wars but free of the kind of conflicts so typical of the 20th century. The Russian-Ukrainian war, however, is more classic than hybrid, with...

A More Multipolar but not more Democratic International Scenario: The Geopolitical (dis)Order of a World in Reconfiguration

Idoia VillanuevaOct, 2022When we talk about geopolitical reordering, we refer to the collapse of the international order that emerged after the fall of the Berlin Wall. Although the international institutional structure dates back to the end of WWII—think of the United Nations, the World Bank and the IMF—it was the end of the Cold War that brought the unipolar hegemony of the United States and its neoliberal economic model. This hegemony has been supported for decades by a combination of what...

Geopolitics and the generative limits of the ungovernable

Rafael HeiberOn decadent realism In a text published shortly before his death [1][1] Bruno Latour, Is Europe's soil changing beneath our feet? Sep 2022, 92-97. Available here: https://geopolitique.eu/en/articles/is-europes-soil-changing-beneath-our-feet/, Bruno Latour questioned Europe’s role in the transition towards a new idea of nation, and thus, of the world. Marked by an armed conflict bringing back fears of a nuclear disaster and by the struggle against extractive regime dragging the...

A geopolitical European Union to what end?

Axel Ruppert“We have now arguably gone further down that path in the past weeks than we did in the previous decade” said Josep Borrell, High Representative of the European Union (EU) for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy one month after Russia started its unprovoked and unjustifiable war in Ukraine [1][1] Josep Borrell (2022): Europe in the Interregnum: our geopolitical awakening after Ukraine. Available at:...